The Sign of Psyche Series

The Sign of Psyche is my fifth novel. It is young adult fantasy, set in the Greek Dark Ages. I enjoyed the research for this because I had to read a lot of books on the time period and on the history of the Greek language. (I took several masters-level courses in Koine Greek at Duke University, so this was just plain fun).

The current draft of the query letter is as follows:

In the Greek Dark Ages, Princess EUPEITHIS forsakes her marriage to a prince she did not choose and flees to find freedom in Amazonia. But running away from marriage has consequences beyond the mortal realm. Cursed by EROS to fall in love with the first man she sees, and protected by PSYCHE with a blindfold which bears the goddess’s sign, Eupeithis becomes the point of contention in a divine marital tiff.

Eupeithis’s arranged marriage to a man she didn’t choose causes her to take her life into her own hands and seek out the only land where women are free to choose for themselves. When she is waylaid by Eros, the god of love and patron of her home city, he curses Eupeithis for rejecting the gift of love he would have given her. Eros’s wife, Psyche, gives Eupeithis the ability to choose how she will face the curse. A hunter named ORTHIOS finds the blindfolded Eupeithis and acts as her guide. As they fight their way through Eros’s traps and other dangers of the Greek Dark Age world, Orthios proves himself the best friend Eupeithis has ever had. She realizes the cost Orthios is willing to pay for her freedom includes enslavement and death in Amazonia, and she is struck by the sacrificial nature of love, even love between friends. With their destination at hand, Eupeithis must find a way to protect Orthios before he sacrifices his freedom or his life for hers.

Combining elements of Greek mythology with Greek Dark Age values gleaned from Epics such as The Iliad. THE SIGN OF PSYCHE is complete at 88,300 words.

A Spear and Shield is the incomplete sequel.

FYI: Eupeithis is pronounced you-PAY-this (th as in thistle or thespian).

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s